Online Banking

Scams and Alerts

The Equifax Data Breach - Information You Need To Know

Ring, ring. "This is Equifax calling to verify your account information." Stop. Don’t tell them anything. They’re not from Equifax. It’s a scam. Equifax will not call you out of the blue.

That’s just one scam you might see after Equifax’s recent data breach. Other calls might try to trick you into giving your personal information. Here are some tips for recognizing and preventing phone scams and imposter scams:

  • Don’t give personal information. Don’t provide any personal or financial information unless you’ve initiated the call and it’s to a phone number you know is correct.
  • Don’t trust caller ID. Scammers can spoof their numbers so it looks like they are calling from a particular company, even when they’re not.
  • If you get a robocall, hang up. Don't press 1 to speak to a live operator or any other key to take your number off the list. If you respond by pressing any number, it will probably just lead to more robocalls.

If you’ve already received a call that you think is fake, report it to the FTC.


Find out if your information has been breached and the steps necessary to protect yourself

The recent Equifax data breach has exposed 143 million Americans to potential identity theft. This breach was caused by hackers gaining access to key items of data including names, Social Security numbers, dates of birth, addresses, driver's license information and credit card numbers.  This breach occurred at Equifax, one of the three national credit reporting companies in the U.S. (Experian and TransUnion being the other two)

This was NOT a compromise of Central Bank and no information was taken from our systems. We wanted to share this information about Equifax to ensure you are aware of the issue and take the proper precautions to reduce the chances of fraud and identify theft. 

We urge every American adult to check with Equifax at 866-447-7559 or via the web at https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/ (Select Tab "Potential Impact") as soon as possible to see if your personal data may have been compromised in this breach. If your data has been compromised, please use precautions to avoid becoming a victim of identity theft. Enroll with the Equifax “TrustedID”  program or any other similar program of your choice and consider placing a fraud alert or credit freeze on your credit report. Credit monitoring alone is not sufficient protection. Information about how to protect yourself is on the Equifax website above.

Equifax
PO Box 740241
Atlanta, GA 30374

www.equifax.com
888-766-0008

Experian
PO Box 9554
Allen, TX 75013

www.experian.com
888-397-3742

TransUnion
PO Box 2000
Chester, PA 19016

www.transunion.com
800-680-7289

If you believe you are the victim of identity theft, you should contact the proper law enforcement authorities, including local law enforcement, and you should consider contacting your state attorney general and/or the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”). You also may contact the FTC to obtain additional information about avoiding identity theft.

Federal Trade Commission, Consumer Response Center 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20580; 1-877-IDTHEFT (438-4338)  www.ftc.gov/idtheft

State Attorneys General: Information on how to contact your state attorney general may be found  at www.naag.org/naag/attorneys-general/whos-my-ag.php.

You may obtain information from the FTC and the credit reporting agencies listed above about placing a fraud alert and/or credit freeze on your credit report. Please also visit the “State Information” tab of this site.

Please contact Equifax for specific questions about the Equifax breach and its effect on your information. Equifax has set up a dedicated call center, which you can contact at 866-447-7559.